Review: “The Half-Drowned King” by Linnea Hartsuyker

Linnea Hartsuyker's epic debut perfectly captures Viking Norway in a way that is exciting, uncompromising and elegantly written.  This is a book of heroes and whilst it draws on the Icelandic Sagas retelling of the making of kings, it's refreshing to find a historical narrative that focuses as much on the female experience as the male without reducing the woman to the role of voiceless lover or pawn.

Review: “Fools And Mortals” by Bernard Cornwell

Review: “Fools And Mortals” by Bernard Cornwell

The King of the historical fiction genre has returned with a stand-alone novel re-telling the first staging of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and I practically ran to the bookstore to buy it. How could I resist? I'm a massive Cornwell fan, he's one of the few authors where I will actively go out and buy the hardback rather than wait for the paperback and this looked like it ticked all my boxes - Cornwell's usual eye for detail with setting and description, theatre and adventure all rolled up together.

Review: “Notes On My Family” by Emily Critchley

"Notes On My Family" is a wonderful, funny, heart breaking YA novel published at the end of last year by the very talented Emily Critchley. Portraying an autistic narrator has a very specific set of challenges for an author, not only do you need to tread the line between being candid and being sensitive, but you also need to avoid the massive pot hole of 'basically Curious Incident'.

Review: “The Snowman” by Jo Nesbø

Review: “The Snowman” by Jo Nesbø

It seems impossible to turn around in a book store or on Twitter without coming face to face with another Nordic Noir crime thriller. The genre seems to have taken on a rather sinister, life of its own. Since Stieg Larsson burst onto the wider literary scene and the BBC started showing "The Killing" and everyone lost their minds about Scandi woolly jumpers, there has been a veritable deluge of work from Scandinavia and Iceland evoking harsh landscapes, dark deeds and terrible weather, normally with a heavy dose of alcoholism thrown in for good measure.

Review: “The Silent Companions” by Laura Purcell

Review: “The Silent Companions” by Laura Purcell

So I've made a sneaky side step from the magical to the mysterious with this chilling Gothic tale that perfectly blends Henry James's "The Turn Of The Screw" with Susan Hill's "The Woman In Black". If you like to give yourself the heebie-jeebies then this is the tale for you. Just make sure you keep the lights on...

Review: “The Rules Of Magic” by Alice Hoffman

Review: “The Rules Of Magic” by Alice Hoffman

I'm struggling to remember the last time I read a book that didn't have magic in it.... This hasn't been an intentional decision - maybe it's just the autumnal weather kicking in, but it has had the beneficial side effect of immersing me in literary depictions of otherworldliness and getting me to think about what I do, and definitely do not, like about how the extraordinary is dealt with by authors. 

The Month In Books: August 2017

The Month In Books: August 2017

It's great to be finally back in the swing of things (sort of) post baby and I actually managed to read enough books to justify a Month In Books post! I realise that most of these are fairly dark in nature, often with a bit of death and paranormal goings on thrown in for luck, which means that this list is probably more appropriate to an October pickings, but ho hum... And whilst they might not be summer beach reads, most of these books are good for being curled up under a blanket with whilst it's gloomy outside - perfect if you're looking for something for the next couple of months yourself.

Review: “Sing, Unburied, Sing” by Jesmyn Ward

Review: “Sing, Unburied, Sing” by Jesmyn Ward

What can I say - one of the best novels of the year so far. "Sing, Unburied, Sing" is part Southern Gothic, part American road novel, part Steinbeck-esque story of people and place. It explores not only the family dynamic of Jojo, his grandparents and his drug addicted mother, but also their ties through the ages - to the dead and the living.

Review: “The House Between Tides” by Sarah Maine

Review: “The House Between Tides” by Sarah Maine

The relentless summer sun of the US East Coast has had me, perversely, hankering for grey skies and sparse landscapes, and as such I've been picking up a fair few novels set in Scotland recently. The gorgeous moody cover of Sarah Maine's debut novel drew me in immediately, as did the back cover descriptions of a gothic and atmospheric novel with a good old dose of murder and mystery. It was just what I needed.