Review: “The Half-Drowned King” by Linnea Hartsuyker

Linnea Hartsuyker's epic debut perfectly captures Viking Norway in a way that is exciting, uncompromising and elegantly written.  This is a book of heroes and whilst it draws on the Icelandic Sagas retelling of the making of kings, it's refreshing to find a historical narrative that focuses as much on the female experience as the male without reducing the woman to the role of voiceless lover or pawn.

Review: “Fools And Mortals” by Bernard Cornwell

Review: “Fools And Mortals” by Bernard Cornwell

The King of the historical fiction genre has returned with a stand-alone novel re-telling the first staging of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and I practically ran to the bookstore to buy it. How could I resist? I'm a massive Cornwell fan, he's one of the few authors where I will actively go out and buy the hardback rather than wait for the paperback and this looked like it ticked all my boxes - Cornwell's usual eye for detail with setting and description, theatre and adventure all rolled up together.

Review: “The House Between Tides” by Sarah Maine

Review: “The House Between Tides” by Sarah Maine

The relentless summer sun of the US East Coast has had me, perversely, hankering for grey skies and sparse landscapes, and as such I've been picking up a fair few novels set in Scotland recently. The gorgeous moody cover of Sarah Maine's debut novel drew me in immediately, as did the back cover descriptions of a gothic and atmospheric novel with a good old dose of murder and mystery. It was just what I needed.

Review: “The Witchfinder’s Sister” by Beth Underdown

Review: “The Witchfinder’s Sister” by Beth Underdown

A new perspective on one of Britain's darkest periods of history. Before the Salem witch trials there was Matthew Hopkins - Britain's self-appointed Witchfinder General. This chilling tale looks at what happened in the years between 1645 and 1647 when he held sway over East Anglia, through the eyes of his widowed sister Alice.

Review: “Revenants: The Odyssey Home”

Review: “Revenants: The Odyssey Home”

This book was always going to have an epic hill to climb as a re-telling of Homer’s “The Odyssey”. By its very nature it was going to have to be expansive both in time and location, not to mention language and structure - all very problematic for an author... There are some elements of this that Scott Kauffman has really nailed and, as to be expected, others that slip through his grasp. In light of this, I am completely torn with this book.