The Literary Bar Crawl: NYC Edition

New York has a great literary heritage and there are so many places you can go to soak up some of the liquid inspiration of great writers. In this list you can find places where poets drank, famous bar settings and places where you can just curl up with a manhattan cocktail in front of a crackling fire surrounded by library shelves. Perfect for warming up on a cold and soggy February weekend.

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The White Horse Tavern

White Horse Tavern

567 Hudson St, New York, NY 10014

This is best described as an ‘old man pub’ – or as close to one as you’re going to get in NYC. It’s been around since the 1880s, is a certified Poetry Landmark and is famed as the bar where Dylan Thomas sank 18 shots of whisky before collapsing outside then dying of alcohol poisoning several days later. But it’s not just Thomas who has been a regular here – Bob Dylan, Anaïs Nin, Norman Mailer, Hunter S. Thompson, and Jack Kerouac all spent plenty of time propping up the bar. Kerouac was such firm fixture that legend has it ‘Go home Kerouac’ was written over the urinals.

The Shakespeare (inside the William Hotel)

24 E 39th St, New York, NY 10016

What was formerly The Peacock and is now The Shakespeare is a British restaurant / gastropub that sits inside the William Hotel and has a great library bar modelled on a Stratford pub called The White Swan. The hotel also houses speakeasy style joint The Raines Law Room where you can quaff beautifully made cocktails surrounded by opulent, cosy bookshelves.

Housing Works Bookstore Café

126 Crosby St, New York, NY 10012

This NYC book institution has a lovely cafe inside it where you can sip a wine or one of their monthly themed cocktails whilst also browsing the shelves. The whole place is staffed by volunteers and the stock is donated so 100% of the profits go to Housing Works’ projects. And if you’re looking for a quirky venue, you can even get married here…

Bookmarks
Bookmarks Bar (photo womeninetfs.com)

Bookmarks Bar at the Library Hotel

This upmarket cocktail lounge will float your boat if you decide you don’t want to slum it with the Beat Poets anymore. The romantic rooftop setting plays the perfect host to  the literary themed cocktails on the menu. Why not try The Pulitzer (Nolet’s Gin, Elderflower, Fernet Branca and agave nectar) or F.Scotch Fitzgerald (Brown buttered Glenmorangie, Campari and Carpano Antica).

Cafe Wah?

115 Macdougal St, New York, NY 10012

Cafe Wah is still a thriving music venue nearly 70 years after it first opened. Allen Ginsberg could often be found here and the likes of Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendricks and Bruce Springsteen all played here whilst launching their careers. This is definitely the place to go if you want to liven things up at the end of your night and with a really eclectic mix of performers there is something for everyone on offer here.

Pete’s Tavern

129 E 18th St, New York, NY 10003

This couldn’t be a literary list of NYC drinking holes without mentioning Pete’s Tavern. In continuous operation since 1864, Pete’s is synonymous with NYC’s writer crowd. The most famous of Pete’s customers was William Sydney Porter – aka O. Henry, the short story writer and in his honour, Pete’s have even kept his booth, where he supposedly wrote The Gift Of The Magi. Legend also has it that Ludwig Bemelmans wrote the first of his wildly popular children’s books – Madeline, on the back of one of the menus…

Minetta Tavern

113 Macdougal St, New York, NY 10012
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Photo revelinnewyork.com

If you need some food to line your stomach after all those delicious cocktails, then hop over to the newly revived Minetta Tavern. A mainstay of the 1930s Greenwich Village writer crowd including Ernest Hemingway, this wonderful restaurant has been taken over by Keith McNally and is now serving perfectly cooked côte de boeuf and french inspired food in sumptuous surroundings. People rave about this steakhouse – why not pop in before heading next door to Cafe Wah?

Rose Club Bar at the Plaza Hotel

768 5th Ave, New York, NY 10019

The Plaza Hotel should be on a literary tour of NYC for any bibliophile – just make sure you don’t dance in the fountain like F.Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald! The Rose Club Bar is the hotel’s in-house jazz club and the perfect place to escape from the hustle and bustle of the city for a spot of luxury. Craft cocktails with their own mixologist mean that drinking here is a totally unique (and wallet punching) experience. On a side note – if you’re a fan of Home Alone 2  and want to live like Kevin, The Plaza are offering experiences based on the movie and they look AWESOME.

 

 

Where would you recommend people go to get a literary drink in NYC? The next edition will be London so get your suggestions in for places for bibliophiles to get a swift one…

Feature photo: goodlifereport.com

Review: “The Snowman” by Jo Nesbø

TheSnowman

Paperback: 576 pages

Publisher: Vintage

Release Date: 5th October 2017 (film tie in re-release)

5 STARS

SET IN OSLO AND BERGEN, NORWAY

 

It seems impossible to turn around in a book store or on Twitter without coming face to face with another Nordic Noir crime thriller. The genre seems to have taken on a rather sinister, life of its own. Since Stieg Larsson burst onto the wider literary scene and the BBC started showing “The Killing” and everyone lost their minds about Scandi woolly jumpers, there has been a veritable deluge of work from Scandinavia and Iceland evoking harsh landscapes, dark deeds and terrible weather, normally with a heavy dose of alcoholism thrown in for good measure.

Jo Nesbo used to be footballer. A very good one apparently, he played in the Norwegian national league. I don’t hold this against him, but he makes a better author.

“The Snowman,” whilst being the first Harry Hole novel I’ve read, is actually the seventh in the series. I don’t usually skip about in a series if I can help it – I don’t like spoilers – but this was a Christmas present from my mother-in-law (which made the detailed sex scene at the start rather excruciating to read…) and I’d seen plenty of Jo Nesbo being reviewed on one of my favourite blogs – Crime By The Book so I couldn’t wait to get started. It also seemed vitally important to read this before the new Michael Fassbender movie version came out and inevitably ruined all the characterisation in my head…

Harry Hole is our obligatory lone wolf hero. A man haunted by lost love and the ever present bottle. When a woman goes missing and there is nothing left behind to guide him but the remains of a sinister snowman in the garden, we are drawn into a dark world of affairs, paternity, revenge and a sadistic killer who seems intent on terrifying children everywhere by commandeering one of the most wonderful things about snow and turning it into a modern day boogeyman.

Whilst much of this novel indulges the familiar tropes of Nordic Noir writing, it doesn’t ever feel hackneyed. I even sat there and congratulated myself on ‘correctly’ guessing the murderer (not once, but twice… what a fool!) only to be flipped around and pointed in the other direction again. Nesbo is a master craftsman when it comes to weaving a gripping plot. The settings might be gloomy and the characters flawed and closed off, but this only adds to the atmosphere.

This is a brilliant piece of crime writing – pacey, dark and full of twists and turns. An absolute must for anyone who is a fan of thrillers, dime bars and hard liquor.

www.jonesbo.com

 

 

Review: “The Silent Companions” by Laura Purcell

SilentCompanions

Hardcover: 384 pages

Publisher: Raven Books

Release Date: 5th October 2017

5 STARS

SET IN ENGLAND (fictional Fayford)

 

So I’ve made a sneaky side step from the magical to the mysterious with this chilling Gothic tale that perfectly blends Henry James’s “The Turn Of The Screw” with Susan Hill’s “The Woman In Black”. If you like to give yourself the heebie-jeebies then this is the tale for you. Just make sure you keep the lights on…

The Blurb: Newly married, newly widowed Elsie is sent to see out her pregnancy at her late husband’s crumbling country estate, The Bridge.

With her new servants resentful and the local villagers actively hostile, Elsie only has her husband’s awkward cousin for company. Or so she thinks. For inside her new home lies a locked room, and beyond that door lies a two-hundred-year-old diary and a deeply unsettling painted wooden figure – a Silent Companion – that bears a striking resemblance to Elsie herself.

I should admit here that I am terrible with scary. I have a wildly overactive imagination. Quelle surprise. So why on earth would I pick this up? The Twitter storm surrounding its release went some way to explain it… and then, to be honest… I was completely suckered by the beautiful, beautiful cover. How bad could it be? I thought. You’ve sat through The Woman In Black in the West End at least five times you complete wuss! Get a grip! Look at that gorgeous frontage – nothing bad could be contained within such a delightful facade… (Note to self: you’ve read Dorian Grey you complete chump – have you learnt nothing about the evil within) Yeah well I managed to spook myself out admirably. In fact, I had to send my husband upstairs to switch on all the lights before I went to bed, which is quite honestly pathetic and embarrassing for a grown woman. And yet I still LOVED it.

Laura Purcell’s novel taps into many of the Gothic genre’s requisite themes – the unreliable narrator, female power and hysteria, a suitably decrepit country pile on a lonely, muddy moor… but it always feels fresh and engrossing. Focusing on terror rather than horror, the book is a slow burner (the irony of this will be apparent when you read it…) in the first few chapters but my God does she pick up the pace. It was almost impossible to put down.

Purcell’s narrative moves effortlessly between 1865 and 1635. She deploys a clever change of voice between these sections and it immerses you fully in each era. The characters are perfect foils for each other, quirky without ever being caricatures and you grow to really invest in them which of course makes the unfolding plot all the more unnerving.

This novel is perfect for winter nights and for fans of classic, claustrophobic Gothic fiction. The whole thing is cleverly put together, never lags and never feels contrived – which for this genre is really saying something. I can’t wait for Purcell’s next offering – “The Corset”.

@spookypurcell

http://www.laurapurcell.com

 

Great Reads In Great Places: Cape Cod

I don’t know about you, but three things spring to mind when I think of Cape Cod:

  1. Beaches. Some of the most gorgeous stretches of sand in New England can be found on this fish hook of land that curls out of Massachusetts into the Atlantic.
  2. Kennedys. Hyannis Port is synonymous with them. You can’t walk more than a block it seems without tripping over a house, memorial or postcard dedicated to America’s most golden of families.
  3. Lobsters. Now a pricey delicacy rather than food for prisoners, you can eat this delicious shellfish from morning ’til night. In fact if you leave without being covered in misfired lobster juice at some point, have you even been to Cape Cod?

Old_Harbor_Life_Saving_Station,_Sunset

Old Harbour Life Saving Station

But it’s not really somewhere, for all its beauty, that I associate with literature. That gets left to its gritty neighbour – Boston, which is positively teeming with alcoholic, brooding detectives and abrasive former boxers either finding redemption or careering towards an ignominious end. My choice for this trip was a collection of short stories – “Cape Cod Noir” compiled and edited by David L. Ulin which promised to get beneath the tourist veneer of preppy, white, rolling in cash to something closer to the real Cape and the New Englanders that live there. Each story is linked to a different town which makes it perfect pick and choose travel literature.

CapeCodNoirEd1

We decided to visit the Cape, as it is affectionately known, on Memorial Day weekend. Rookie error. Turns out, this is one of the busiest times of the year in Cape Cod and there is basically one road in and out. Route 6A is a gorgeous drive from the east of Boston down the length of the peninsula cutting through many of the small historic towns that make up the larger area which is Cape Cod (turns out that it’s not an actual place as such…) but it is also one MASSIVE bottle neck as all the local traffic feeds into it. You can safely double whatever drive time Google Maps gives you and add a bit for good measure.

Our bed and breakfast, The Belfry, was in Sandwich, on the north side of the Cape. The town itself is beautiful, a picture postcard New England town complete with white clapboard houses that look like they’ve stepped out of the pages of Martha Stewart’s Living and it’s quiet – something that I’ve come to really appreciate since moving to NYC. The B and B is actually made up of three separate buildings, not just the converted church that contains the main dining room and reception, all beautifully maintained and decorated in a typical colonial style. This meant that we were able to be in a room that was a little out of the way (baby in tow and super thin wooden walls do not friends make) and we were grateful for the privacy that came with having our own porch and entrance and somewhere to park the stroller. Breakfast here is limited in choice but awesome and the owner/manager is very knowledgeable and helpful, offering us itineraries and ideas as well as great restaurant recommendations.

We discovered pretty quickly that there is not a huge amount to do in Sandwich itself – especially on a slightly grey weekend in May. If you want a bit of action and walkable restaurants and shops then you’re better off in Chatham or Hyannis. This place is all about the beach and the boardwalk, which is beautiful and cuts across a large patch of marshland by the coast. There are lots of steps up and over the dunes though, so this place is not really stroller or wheelchair friendly. Sandy Neck Beach and Town Neck Beach are two of the most popular in the area and it is easy to see why. These are long stretches of sandy beach that go down to a nice open shoreline that’s perfect for swimming. There’s also plenty of parking if you don’t fancy a long wander through largely residential streets (although this is great for house perving if you like New England architecture).

Beyond the beach you can really take it all in in under a day – there’s Dexter’s Grist Mill, a mid 17th century mill restored in the 1960s which is worth a look and then it’s a short stroll to the Glass Museum which Sandwich is famous for. If you want to stray about 1/2 mile outside of town it’s worth going to see the Hoxie House which gives you a good understanding of how life was lived in the 1630s on the Cape. If you manage to pack that in and have a few hours to spare before dinner then there are some gorgeous antique shops tucked away to help you while away the time.

Foodwise, we wanted seafood, seafood and more seafood. It seemed a capital crime to come to Cape Cod and not indulge. A great lunch spot is The Pilot House, there is plenty of outdoor seating and a great view of the modern harbour. The menu is extensive and reasonably priced – even the lobster roll, which comes in a choice of sizes and breads. Not only was it delicious, it was enormous, which let’s face it is something you don’t often get too say about lobster sandwiches.

LobsterSandwich

On our second day we decided to drive further out along the peninsula to Chatham. There was some debate amongst the party about going south – there is a great cycle / walk route from Falmouth to Woods Hole, The Shining Sea Bikeway, but as it was pretty wet and miserable, those of us who wanted to duck from shop to pretty shop won out.

If I were to do this trip again I think I would actually have our base in Chatham. It really reminds me of Padstow in Cornwall, England mixed with East Hampton NY – smart shops and restaurants with a nautical leaning and pretty frontages. There is certainly more to do here, especially on a wet day. There was a mad dash through the downpour to Chatham Lighthouse, very New England, and an attempt to salvage something of the view from the cliff top. I imagine this is far more impressive when there isn’t low lying cloud… In better weather there is plenty of opportunities to investigate the wildlife that the area is famous for. Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge is nearby and you can take a variety of trips out to do dolphin, shark and whale watching, which is something I’d definitely do if I came again.

Lighthouse

We grabbed lunch at The Impudent Oyster before hitting our nightmare drive back to NYC. The inside of this Chatham institution is homely and no fuss but the food is excellent. Much delicious chowder was consumed, the seafood stew was declared marvellous and they even did a decent beer battered fish and chips, something that us Brits struggle to find in the US to be honest. There are no baby changing facilities here though – it’s the car (if you can get a parking spot anywhere near the restaurant) or the loo floor. Luckily there are plenty of lovely friendly locals who will jump at the chance to hold your baby whilst you pack up all your stuff!

Bookshops:

There are plenty of bookshops all over the Cape but three that I think are well worth a trip are Titcomb’s Bookshop in East Sandwich, The Brewster Book Store in Brewster and Where The Sidewalk Ends (what a great name!) in Chatham. All are independent, big tick, and can advise on locally set reads and authors.

The Great Read: “Cape Cod Noir” compiled by David L. Ulin

“Cape Cod Noir” is part of series of noir style compilations that centre on various towns and cities around the world (so if you like the concept you can pretty much pick up one for wherever you are headed on your holidays) and is published by Akashic Noir. I always like a short story selection to pick through. It’s digestible and if you don’t like an author’s style you aren’t married to it for a further 500 pages out of sheer stubbornness. I am a chronic book finisher, even if I hate it. As you might expect, the quality of the fiction is a little up and down – Cape Cod is a small area, I guess you’re fairly limited as an editor in what you can select from, but it certainly delivers on its promise to explore the dark and unseen underbelly of this glamorous part of the world.

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I particularly enjoyed “Variations on a Fifty Pound Bale” by Adam Mansbach – the structural concept of this story, exploring how urban legends can be built up, is fun and focuses on Martha’s Vineyard. “Bad Night in Hyannis Port” by Seth Greenland was a great example of the alienation of youth that is a running theme in this book. There’s a little of “Catcher In The Rye” in its disaffected frat boy narrator and ‘bad night’ doesn’t really tell the half of it! If death and narrators from beyond the grave a your thing, “When Death Shines Bright.” set in Sandwich, is a classic piece of dark noir.

Overall this is an enjoyable read, with a couple of real highlights. I love the concept of compiling short fiction set in a particular place and will definitely be revisiting the series for other cities.

Already read it? 

Why not try these other titles set in Cape Cod:

  • “Caleb’s Crossing” – Geraldine Brooks
  • “The Orphans of Race Point” – Party Francis
  • “The Sparrow Sister” – Ellen Herrick
  • “Love Antony” – Lisa Genova

 

Feel free to add any of your own Cape Cod recommendations in the comments below 🙂