Taking Control Of Your Creative Clutter

Taking Control Of Your Creative Clutter

Every three months or so I find myself overtaken by an almost uncontrollable sense of claustrophobia and clutter rage. I'm naturally quite a messy person and whilst I definitely find creativity in the organised chaos of my house, there is a tipping point where suddenly all I can think about is pulling out all of my books, reorganising my shelves and cupboards and having a good old throw out. 

Review: “Fools And Mortals” by Bernard Cornwell

Review: “Fools And Mortals” by Bernard Cornwell

The King of the historical fiction genre has returned with a stand-alone novel re-telling the first staging of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and I practically ran to the bookstore to buy it. How could I resist? I'm a massive Cornwell fan, he's one of the few authors where I will actively go out and buy the hardback rather than wait for the paperback and this looked like it ticked all my boxes - Cornwell's usual eye for detail with setting and description, theatre and adventure all rolled up together.

The Power of a Fresh Start: Books That Require No Eating, Praying or Loving…

The Power of a Fresh Start: Books That Require No Eating, Praying or Loving…

January is always such a weird month. On one hand it is full of eager optimism and well meaning resolutions to not wear active wear. every. day. and follow a grown up skincare regime and to make this year OUR YEAR and yet it is also so bleak, so dreich, so... well frankly depressing.

Review: “Notes On My Family” by Emily Critchley

"Notes On My Family" is a wonderful, funny, heart breaking YA novel published at the end of last year by the very talented Emily Critchley. Portraying an autistic narrator has a very specific set of challenges for an author, not only do you need to tread the line between being candid and being sensitive, but you also need to avoid the massive pot hole of 'basically Curious Incident'.

Review: “The Snowman” by Jo Nesbø

Review: “The Snowman” by Jo Nesbø

It seems impossible to turn around in a book store or on Twitter without coming face to face with another Nordic Noir crime thriller. The genre seems to have taken on a rather sinister, life of its own. Since Stieg Larsson burst onto the wider literary scene and the BBC started showing "The Killing" and everyone lost their minds about Scandi woolly jumpers, there has been a veritable deluge of work from Scandinavia and Iceland evoking harsh landscapes, dark deeds and terrible weather, normally with a heavy dose of alcoholism thrown in for good measure.

Review: “The Silent Companions” by Laura Purcell

Review: “The Silent Companions” by Laura Purcell

So I've made a sneaky side step from the magical to the mysterious with this chilling Gothic tale that perfectly blends Henry James's "The Turn Of The Screw" with Susan Hill's "The Woman In Black". If you like to give yourself the heebie-jeebies then this is the tale for you. Just make sure you keep the lights on...