Fiction, Reviews, YA

YA Review: “Fever 1793” by Laurie Halse Anderson

781110

Paperback: 272 pages

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

Release Date: March 1, 2002

3 STARS

SET IN PHILADELPHIA

This is a classic coming-of-age story in a historical setting and whilst the narrative itself is rather formulaic, it is very well researched and would give younger readers plenty of historical perspective.

It follows Mattie Cook, a 14 year old girl who gets caught up in the Philadelphia yellow fever outbreak of 1793 and learns to survive despite the odds. There’s action, a bit of highly sanitized teenage romance and a healthy dollop of familial relationships.

The aspects that are most appealing in this YA novel mean that it will probably hit home more with girls than boys. It explores what it means to be a ‘good girl,’ expectations of behaviour and mother daughter relationships in a manner that clearly links the past and present. The change in Mattie as she learns to take care of herself and grows up is dealt with well and doesn’t bash you over the head with obvious metaphor. It is also somewhat convenient that by telling the story of the plague through the eyes of a child, Anderson is able to side skip much of the political implications of the time – everyone is stripped back to common humanity despite class and race.

Overall this is a sound read but I can see how some readers might become frustrated with the fact that the main events – people falling sick and everyone else turning into either nurses or looters, could become repetitive.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s