Fiction, Reviews, The Month in Books

The Month in Books: February 2017

I’ve been up against it this month – I started my TBR list quite late, and it’s a short month. I know… excuses excuses! Still, I’ve got six books to feedback to you on and there’s a little bit of something for everyone…

AmericanahChimamanda Ngozi Adichie        *****

imgresI loved this. The book follows Ifemelu and Obinze, childhood sweethearts, who try to pursue new lives away from their home in Lagos, Nigeria. For me, this was a perfect coming together of author and reader in terms of timing, I felt it really spoke to me. It was great to see it up all around the subway too and I voted  for it as part of #OneBookNY. The characterisation was really sensitive and I thought the descriptions and emotions were astutely drawn. The novel itself is quite slow paced but that didn’t matter; I felt like it was just unfolding gradually as the characters adapted to their new lives. A totally relevant read given the current political climate in the US. See full post.

The Thin ManDashiell Hammett       ***

8736380

 

A classic murder mystery. I liked the pithy style and slick art deco settings – but was distracted by everyone getting drunk all the time! It’s hard to really rate it though when you’ve been raised on Wodehouse. It’s a classy book but felt more like style over substance.

 

Hanging MarySusan Higginbotham     ***

25620676I love historical fiction but found this quite slow. The novel tells the story of Abraham Lincoln’s assassination by John Wilkes Booth from the point of view of Mary Surratt, a co-conspirator who became the first woman to be hanged by the United States, and her lodger, Nora. I must admit I didn’t really bond with the characters which made it hard to care about the outcome and whilst it really picked up pace in the second half, it was a little late by then. The settings are carefully researched and it’s great to have important historical events told by a female protagonist – although this does often mean that key action has to be missed and it is hard to maintain the level of tension when the really exciting bits happen ‘off-stage’ as it were. Unfortunately I also found the historical tone of the first person not entirely convincing, but his might just be me – I get a real bee in my bonnet about first person narration that doesn’t ring true!

Girl At WarSara Nović     *****

imgresThis was a brilliant book. Set during and after the Balkans war in the 1990s, it follows a young Croatian girl, Ana Jurić, who’s life has been shaped by the break up of Yugoslavia; an era and location that I haven’t seen many books about. It deals with the impact of war in an uncompromising manner combined with beautiful, poetic writing. The structure of the book is cleverly done, revealing Ana’s attempts at getting to grips with her past gradually and drawing you in. I was genuinely shocked and emotional at times reading this, despite the almost detached tone. This is another book that is great to read if you’re looking for something that is politically relevant in terms of international relations, the role of the UN peacekeepers, genocide and asylum. It’s also really interesting as Nović is a deaf author – the book is beautifully observed.

The Winter SeaSusanna Kearsley       ***

51gmz3kroml

 

This was a recommendation from another book blogger – A Wee Reader (check her out here) and I’m so pleased I took it up. I really enjoyed this despite some shortcomings. See full review.

 

 

 

Fever 1793 Laurie Halse Anderson       ***

781110This is a historical YA book that’s really well researched but I didn’t love it. Set during the yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia in 1793, it’s the classic coming-of-age story of Mattie Cook. It will appeal more to girls than boys I suspect – there’s lots about mother – daughter relationships and society’s expectations of women… the need to be a ‘good’ girl. With my teacher hat on it could open some interesting discussions with younger readers, there’s lots of Mattie’s inner monologue that seeks to put her down and how she moves past that, learning self reliance and dealing with loss. I also hated the front cover design – it looks like someone has coloured it in with a neon yellow highlighter…. Full review to come as part of a Great Read Great Place post in Philadelphia.

My March TBR list is still under construction so let me know if you think there’s something I should add 🙂

3 thoughts on “The Month in Books: February 2017”

  1. I’m sure you’ve read it but just in case – A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith is definitely worth a read, and what could be more appropriate.

    Like

    1. Indeed – I haven’t actually read it (does that make me a bad person?!) I’ve been seeing it everywhere though since you mentioned it so it’s going on the tbr list!

      Like

  2. I am a big fan of historical fiction too and I appreciate the in depth review of “Hanging Mary.” I had read some other historical fiction lists in which this book was included but no one was discussing it very much. I just read the first book in a fantastic historical fiction series called, “Robbing the Pillars” by Kalen Vaughan Johnson. The main character, Scottish immigrant, James MacLaren has to flee Scotland with his family after killing a man and in hopes of a better life. They head to California during the Gold Rush and he takes on the very difficult job of mining. It’s a phenomenal family saga and you get to watch the family grow and definitely become attached to them all! I can’t recommend it enough. Perhaps it can be added to a future list. You can read a bit more about the book and the series here: http://kalenvaughanjohnson.com/
    Thanks again and Happy Reading!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s